Covid19Avoid close contact with people who are sick. Stay home if you are sick. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. What You Need to Know About COVID-19 Coronavirus COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is a respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that can spread from person to person. Symptoms Stay safe. Cover coughs and sneezes with your arm or inner elbow – NOT your hands. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If you don’t have soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Fever Cough Shortness of breath Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. Symptoms typically develop within 2-14 days of being exposed. Most people with COVID-19 will experience mild illness that does not require hospitalization, but some people who are at higher risk for serious illness can develop further medical complications. The virus is thought to spread mainly between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet) through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. To protect yourself from COVID-19, you should follow the same steps that help to prevent other illnesses, like the flu: You can help keep others safe. If you live in or are visiting an area where COVID-19 is reported to be spreading, practicing “social distancing” can help. Social distancing is deliberately increasing the physical space between people to avoid spreading illness (at least 6 feet). Often this means changing our usual behaviors for a time to avoid coming into contact with COVID-19 and potentially spreading it to others—for instance: • Avoiding large groups of people • Only going out when and where it’s necessary • Working from home when possible Steps like these can help to slow the spread of the virus among homes and communities, and protect people who are at higher risk for serious illness, like older people and people with weakened immune systems. Page 1 of 2 People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown increased risk. If you are in one of these categories, come up with a plan with your health care provider to identify your health risks for COVID-19 and how to manage symptoms. Contact your doctor right away if you do have symptoms. Learn more. Stay informed. Learning the facts about COVID-19 can help you stay safe. For the most accurate information and to learn more, visit: • www.cdc.gov/coronavirus • www.coronavirus.ohio.gov • www.columbus.gov/coronavirus • https://covid-19.myfcph.org Some people are at a higher risk for COVID-19. Know what to do if you think you are sick. What do I do if I’m feeling sick? If you are feeling sick and believe you have been exposed to COVID-19, call your health care provider to discuss your symptoms before going in. Your health care provider will determine your next steps for care. In the meantime, you should continue to follow steps that help to prevent the spread of illness and avoid being in contact with other people. If you don’t have a health care provider, call your local health care department to be connected to resources for care. • For residents of Columbus and Worthington: Columbus Public Health* – (614) 645-1519 • For residents of Bexley, Canal Winchester, Dublin, Gahanna, Grandview Heights, Grove City, Groveport, Hilliard, New Albany, Pickerington, Reynoldsburg, Upper Arlington and Westerville: Franklin County Public Health – (614) 525-3160 *Please note: Columbus Public Health does not ask visitors for citizenship documentation. How do I get tested for COVID-19? Only a health care provider can evaluate your symptoms for COVID-19 and order a test. What do I do if I’m diagnosed with COVID-19? Your health care provider will give you information on how to treat your symptoms. In addition to following care instructions, you should also self-isolate at this time – do not go to school, work or other places with large groups of people. Isolation separates sick people who are contagious from people who are not sick. During this time you should stay home (in a separate bedroom and ideally with a separate bathroom) except to get medical care, separate yourself from other people and animals in your home, avoid sharing personal items, monitor your symptoms, and call your provider if your illness is worsening or before ending your isolation. Your family or household members who don’t have symptoms should self-quarantine. Quarantine separates people believed to have been exposed to an illness from others who have not been exposed to prevent possible spread. During this time, your family should stay home except to get medical care, separate themselves from you while you isolate, frequently clean all “high-touch” surfaces, monitor themselves for symptoms, and seek medical attention if they develop fever or other respiratory symptoms. Franklin CountyPublic Health What You Need to Know About COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Page 2 of 2 3/30/2020 People are more at risk for COVID-19 if they live in or have recently traveled to places where ongoing community spread of the virus has been reported, OR if they have been in close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19. Those who are at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 include: • People aged 65 years and older • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility • People with high-risk conditions such as: –– Chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma –– Serious heart conditions –– Being immunocompromised (Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications.) –– Severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] >40) –– Certain underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk

COVID Advisory in South Asian Language Resources

English | Hindi | Tamil | Malyalam | Punjabi | Telugu | Bengali

Marathi | Kannada | Nepali | Burmese | Urdu | Burmese | Gujarati

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 30, 2020

https://www.equalitylabs.org/covid19guide

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine Week in Review
For the week ending May 8, 2020
Throughout the week, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine was joined by Lt. Governor Jon Husted and Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton M.D., MPH, and provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On Monday, Governor DeWine provided an update on Ohio’s plan for increased COVID-19 testing. A new partnership announced last week between the state of Ohio, Thermo Fisher, and ROE Dental Scientific will allow for a steady supply of testing reagent and swabs. With Ohio’s new increased testing capacity, Ohio will prioritize testing in the following categories: 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 28, 2020MEDIA CONTACTS: Dan Tierney: 614-644-0957 Breann Almos: 614-799-6480COVID-19 Update: Testing, Assisted Living Visitation, Premium Deferrals, Fairs(COLUMBUS, Ohio)— Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. PHARMACY TESTING:Governor DeWine announced today that the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy has clarified rules that allow pharmacists to order and administer tests for COVID-19. “As frontline health care providers, pharmacies are critical in our state’s response to this pandemic,” said Governor DeWine. “I have asked the Ohio Board of Pharmacy to make sure that Ohio pharmacies have what they need to test for COVID-19.”To help Ohioans find testing locations, a map has been added to coronavirus.ohio.gov that lists COVID-19 testing centers in Ohio. The map includes links to community health centers and pharmacy sites to assist citizens in finding information about how to get a test referral or schedule an appointment.UPDATED PRIORITY TESTING: Ohio has utilized COVID-19 testing priorities to manage limited testing capacity.  Under the guidance of clinical experts, Governor DeWine announced that Ohio has modified these groups in light of changes in testing availability and evolving knowledge of COVID-19 and its impact on Ohioans.Testing must be first available to individuals described in Priority Groups 1, 2 and 3, but Ohio is expanding to allow partners and communities to test Ohioans in Priority Group 4 which includes testing “Individuals in the community to decrease community spread, including individuals with symptoms who do not meet any of the above categories.””Expanded test availability will allow individuals in lower-risk tiers to be tested and to help further contain and respond to COVID-19 in Ohio,” said Governor DeWine. ASSISTED LIVING VISITATION: Governor DeWine announced a plan to lift restrictions on visitation at assisted living homes in Ohio. Beginning on June 8, 2020, properly prepared assisted living facilities and intermediate care facilities for individuals with developmental disabilities can begin to allow outdoor visitation.The lifted restrictions do not yet apply to nursing homes. “We will continue to examine, monitor, and adjust as we carefully and thoughtfully lift restrictions on visitation,” said Governor DeWine. “The well-being of our residents has been, and remains, central to our decision-making.” The decision to move forward with outdoor visitation for assisting living facilities and intermediate care facilities was made while considering requests from families and residents and considering the impact on the quality of life a prolonged loss of connection can have on an individual. Advocates and providers in the aging and development disabilities communities were also consulted, and guidelines for visitation were jointly developed by the Academy for Senior Health Sciences, Leading Age Ohio, the Ohio Assisted Living Association, the Ohio Health Care Association, and the Ohio Medical Director’s Association.Because each facility is different, each facility can determine how to best implement outdoor visitations, however, at a minimum, all facilities must develop a policy that includes:Screening for temperatures and symptom-reporting for visitorsScheduled hours and time limits for visitsProper social distancing measuresFace coveringsResident, family, and friend education about the risks of the spread of COVID-19Consideration for visitors during end-of-life situations will also be expanded. Providers should notify family members when a resident’s substantial change of condition indicates end-of-life is approaching. Providers should not wait until a resident is actively dying to allow visitors.OHIO BWC DEFERS PREMIUM INSTALLMENTS: The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) is deferring Ohio employers’ premium installments for the months of June, July, and August. Businesses will have the option to defer the monthly premium payments with no financial penalties. “By extending the premium due date, businesses can continue to focus on the safety and well-being of their employees and customers during this health pandemic,” said Governor DeWine. This is the second payment deferral BWC has given to employers amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.  The deferral is designed to help employers focus financial resources on re-opening their businesses under the Responsible RestartOhio Plan.JUNIOR FAIRS/COUNTY FAIRS/INDEPENDENT FAIRS:Governor DeWine’s Fair Advisory Group has released guidelines for how county fair boards and agricultural societies can work with county health departments to safely operate junior fairs for kids.The guidelines focus on maintaining social distancing, limiting crowds, ensuring the health of everyone involved in the junior fair activities, and animal care and welfare.“The decisions about county and independent fairs need to be made locally because each county and independent fair is unique and has different challenges,” said Governor DeWine. “Conditions may change over the course of the summer, however, we are asking all fair boards to comply with all of the orders of the Ohio Department of Health and the guidelines for other sectors that would also apply to fairs, such as for food service and rides.” The Ohio Department of Agriculture is in the process of distributing all state funding available for Ohio’s 94 county and independent fairs.   CURRENT OHIO DATA:There are 33,915 confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 in Ohio and 2,098 confirmed and probable COVID-19 deaths. A total of 5,811 people have been hospitalized, including 1,516 admissions to intensive care units. In-depth data can be accessed by visiting coronavirus.ohio.gov. Video of today’s full update, including versions with foreign language translation, can be viewed on the Ohio Channel’s YouTube page. For more information on Ohio’s response to COVID-19, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH.
COVID Testing

Lt. Governor Husted announced that, although opening dates for individual locations have not yet been finalized, Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicle (BMV) deputy registrars around the state may begin reopening later this month.

Upon reopening, every deputy registrar will offer online the Ohio BMV’s Get In Line, Online program that was launched by Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor Husted as a pilot project last year. A partnership between InnovateOhio and the Ohio BMV has been expanding the project to locations statewide. There are currently 48 deputy registrars that had been offering Get in Line, Online, and all other locations that had not yet offered the service will offer it to customers upon reopening. 

In preparation for reopening, deputy registrars are also reactivating and hiring staff, making accommodations to their facilities to ensure social distancing, and ensuring that safety measures are in place, such as cough/sneeze shields, at customer-facing workstations. 


On Tuesday, Governor DeWine announced $775 million in reductions to Ohio’s General Revenue Fund for the remainder of Fiscal Year 2020 which ends on June 30. 

Because Ohio is mandated to balance its budget each year, and in addition to identifying areas of savings, the following budget reductions will be made for the next two months:

  • Medicaid:  $210 million
  • K12 Foundation Payment Reduction:  $300 million
  • Other Education Budget Line Items:  $55 million
  • Higher Education:  $110 million
  • All Other Agencies:  $100 million

The budget reductions are in addition to Governor DeWine’s March 23 directive to freeze hiring, new contracts, pay increases, and promotions at all state agencies, boards, and commissions.

The new budget reductions will not apply to critical services available to Ohioans or COVID-19 pandemic services. Money to balance the Fiscal Year 2020 budget will not be drawn from Ohio’s Budget Stabilization Fund, otherwise known as the “rainy-day fund.”

Projections by Ohio Office of Budget and Management (OBM) Director Kim Murnieks indicate that the state’s revenues will continue to be below estimates in the coming months as Ohio moves through the COVID-19 crisis. Governor DeWine, Lt. Governor Husted, and Director Murnieks will continue to work with the Ohio General Assembly to identify ways to continue supporting Ohio’s economy through the COVID-19 crisis.


On Thursday, Governor DeWine and Lt. Governor Husted announced the next phase of the Responsible RestartOhio plan as it related to restaurants, bars, and personal care services.

Restaurants and bars in Ohio will be permitted to reopen as follows: 

  • Outdoor dining: May 15
  • Dine-in service: May 21

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Restaurant Advisory Group created a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for restaurant and bar owners to follow. The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Personal care services such as hair salons, barbershops, day spas, nail salons, and tanning facilities may reopen on May 15. 

To ensure that these establishments operate in the safest manner possible, Governor DeWine’s Personal Services Advisory Group created a detailed list of guidelines and best practices for personal care service providers to follow. The full list of mandatory and recommended best practices can be found at coronavirus.ohio.gov.


Additionally, on Monday, Governor DeWine ordered that all United States and Ohio flags be flown at half-staff In honor of the lives of those killed and injured and those whose lives were forever altered by the tragedy of May 4, 1970, at Kent State University.

On Wednesday, Governor DeWine issued the following statement regarding the death of former Pickaway County Sheriff Dwight Radcliff: 

“Former Pickaway County Sheriff Dwight Radcliff has been my friend for four decades. I first met him when I was running for Congress in 1982.  We hit it off because of my background as a county prosecutor.  Even then Dwight was a legend in law enforcement!  

“He combined his skills as a people person with the drive and skills of an experienced lawman.  That combination served the people of Pickaway County and the people of Ohio for 48 years.  After he left the Sheriff’s office when I was Attorney General, I asked him to be my liaison with law enforcement around the state.  His people skills and law enforcement savvy served us so very well. 

“He was both a great judge of character and an old-fashioned law enforcement officer, who combined his law enforcement savvy and experience with respect and compassion for people.  Simply put, he just knew how to treat people.

“Fran and I have lost a dear friend.  His beloved wife Betty has been his partner and by his side for his entire law enforcement career — and she also served the people of Pickaway County so very well. Our hearts go out to Betty; their children Vicky, Dwight, and Sheriff Robert Radcliff; and their families.”

Governor DeWine also ordered that U.S. and Ohio flags in Pickaway County be flown at half-staff in honor of the life and service of former Pickaway County Sheriff Dwight Radcliff, who served as the elected sheriff of Pickaway County for 48 years and at the time of his retirement was the longest serving sheriff in the United States.

Wednesday evening, Governor DeWine issued the following statement on the proposed legislative amendments regarding state public health orders:

“My administration is focused on the important things we need to do to help businesses responsibly reopen while protecting Ohioans’ health and safety. This week alone, this included increasing coronavirus testing and tracing, balancing Ohio’s budget, and working on plans to move Ohio’s economy forward. Ohioans need their legislators focused on these important issues. Creating more uncertainty regarding public health and employee safety is the last thing we need as we work to restore consumer confidence in Ohio’s economy.”


As of Friday afternoon, there are 23,016 confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 in Ohio and 1,306 confirmed and probable COVID-19 deaths. A total of 4,218 people have been hospitalized, including 1,188 admissions to intensive care units. In-depth data can be accessed by visiting coronavirus.ohio.gov

For more information on Ohio’s response to COVID-19, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH.

MEDIA CONTACTS: Dan Tierney: 614-644-0957 Breann Almos: 614-799-6480

WEEK IN REVIEW
Friday, May 1, 2020
Ohio Governor Mike DeWine Week in Review
For the week ending May 1, 2020
Throughout the week, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine was joined by Lt. Governor Jon Husted and Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton M.D., MPH, and provided the following updates on Ohio’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On Monday, Governor DeWine, Lt. Governor and Dr. Acton announced Ohio’s plan to responsibly restart Ohio’s economy.  The guiding principles of the Responsible RestartOhio plan are protecting the health of employees, customers, and their families, supporting community efforts to control the spread of COVID-19, and responsibly getting Ohio back to work. Beginning May 1, 2020, all medically necessary procedures that do not require an overnight stay in a healthcare facility, or do not require inpatient hospital admission and minimizes use of personal protective equipment, may move forward. This includes regular doctor visits, well-care checks, well-baby visits, out-patient surgeries, imaging procedures, and diagnostic tests. Dental services and veterinary services may also proceed if a safe environment can be established. Beginning on May 4, 2020, manufacturing, distribution, and construction businesses may reopen if these businesses can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees. Beginning on May 4, 2020, general office environments may reopen if these businesses can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees. Beginning on May 12, 2020, consumer, retail and services, may reopen if these businesses can meet mandatory safety requirements for customers and employees. The following types of establishments are ordered to remain closed due to their increased risk of potential COVID-19 exposure: Schools and daycares, dine-in restaurants and bars (carry-out is still permitted), personal appearance and beauty businesses, older adult daycare services, and senior centers, adult day support or vocational rehabilitation services in group settings, entertainment, recreation, and gyms. For greater detail on the Responsible Restart Ohio plan, or the types of businesses that must stay closed, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov/ResponsibleRestartOhio. On Tuesday, Governor DeWine announced that the state of Ohio will not require customers entering retail establishments wear face coverings. Wearing face coverings in public is still, however, strongly recommended. Governor DeWine also noted that individual business owners could still choose to develop a business policy requiring face coverings for customers to enter their facilities. Face coverings would still be mandated for employees unless wearing a face covering is not advisable by a healthcare professional, goes against industry best practices, or is not permitted by federal or state laws and regulations. Governor DeWine also announced that he will form two separate advisory groups to develop best practices for reopening dine-in restaurants, barbershops, and salons. The goal of these groups is to develop recommendations for these businesses that balance the need to protect the health of employees and customers as they reopen to the public. On Wednesday, Governor DeWine announced that the state of Ohio has shipped 4.1 million pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) to local emergency management agencies (EMA) across Ohio. Although this is not the first shipment of PPE, this is the largest one-time distribution of PPE from the state of Ohio to the local EMAs in Ohio history. Lt. Governor Husted reemphasized that face coverings are required for employers and employees while on the job. Exceptions for employers and employees include when: An employee in a particular position is prohibited by a law or regulation from wearing a face covering while on the job. Wearing a face covering on the job is against documented industry best practices. Wearing a face covering is not advisable for health purposesIf wearing a face covering is a violation of a company’s safety policies. An employee is sitting alone in an enclosed workspaceThere is a practical reason a face covering cannot be worn by an employeeIf any of these exceptions apply to a business or employee, written justification must be provided upon request.Governor DeWine also announced that nearly $16 million in grant funding is now available for local law enforcement agencies, probation and parole offices, local courts, victim service providers, and adult, juvenile, and community corrections agencies. This funding was awarded to the Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS), a division of the Ohio Department of Public Safety, as part of the CARES Act and will support agencies in:Taking measures to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 such as purchasing cleaning supplies and personal protective equipmentTaking measures to prepare for COVID-19 such as supporting proper planning, staffing, and communications to ensure effective operations and maintain the safety of criminal justice employees, citizens, and correctional populationsTaking measures to respond to the spread of COVID-19 such as medical visits, hospitalizations, purchasing medical supplies, and securing alternative housing. OCJS will accept applications on a continual basis while funding is available, and there is no cap.  For more information, please visit www.ocjs.ohio.gov. Additionally, Governor DeWine reminded Ohio educators that they must ensure social distancing during any and all graduation ceremonies. The Ohio Department of Education and Ohio Department of Health today issued the following suggestions for local schools and health departments: Virtual graduation ceremonies (preferred)Drive-in ceremonies where students drive to a designated location at a designated time to get their diplomasOutdoor ceremonies with 10 people or less who are socially distancedAdditional guidance can be found on the Ohio Department of Education’s website. Governor DeWine also stressed that any graduation parties cannot exceed 10 people in one space. On Thursday, Governor DeWine announced that Ohio has provided more than 1.1 million items of personal protective equipment (PPE) to Ohio’s state prisons. Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (ODRC) Director Annette Chambers Smith provided an overview of the steps taken within Ohio’s state correction facilities to protect inmates and staff, as well as to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in their facilities.ODRC has implemented several safeguards for inmates, including increasing hygiene products and sanitation materials, offering cloth face coverings, and preventing intermingling between inmate cohorts.Although ODRC’s inmate population is the lowest it has been since 2006, social distancing measures have also been implemented by expanding housing units into prison chapels and gyms. Additionally, the Ohio National Guard has constructed tents at two facilities to further separate inmates. Members of the Ohio National Guard are also assisting with staffing and health care.Mass testing at the Marion Correctional Institution revealed that approximately 96 percent of inmates who tested positive for COVID-19 were asymptomatic, further demonstrating that individuals can spread the virus without knowing that they are infected. Mass testing also took place at the Pickaway Correctional Institution and the prison medical center in Columbus. ODRC plans to test inmates in all state prison facilities who are symptomatic, as well as those who are being released early or at the conclusion of their full sentences. Any inmates who have been granted early release and test positive for COVID-19 will not be released until medically cleared. ODRC has surged an ample amount of PPE to facility staff, and staff members at high-risk locations have also been offered the use of hotel rooms instead of going home or for showering before returning to their families. On Friday, Governor DeWine announced that the Ohio Department of Health has issued a “Stay Safe Ohio Order.” The new order, which incorporates the openings of businesses and services announced as part of the Responsible RestartOhio plan, will replace the previous “Stay at Home” order, which expires at 11:59 p.m. Friday night. Governor DeWine announced the members of two separate advisory groups for recommendations and best practices when reopening dine-in restaurants, and personal service locations throughout the state. Members of the two advisory groups were identified by relevant business association, along with Ohio Speaker of the House Larry Householder, Senate President Larry Obhof, House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes, and Senate Minority Leader Kenny Yuko. The restaurant advisory group will develop and recommend best practices for reopening dine-in restaurants throughout the state and balance the need to protect the health of employees and customers.  A listing of individuals serving on the restaurants advisory group can be found here. The personal services advisory group will also develop and recommend best practices for reopening hair salons, day spas, nail salons, barber shops, massage therapy locations, and tanning facilities throughout the state.  A list of individuals serving on the personal services advisory group can be found here. As of Friday afternoon, there are 18,743 confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 in Ohio and 1,002 confirmed and probable COVID-19 deaths. A total of 3,634 people have been hospitalized, including 1,056 admissions to intensive care units. In-depth data can be accessed by visiting coronavirus.ohio.gov. For more information on Ohio’s response to COVID-19, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH.Additionally, Governor DeWine made the following appointments this week:Chauncey A. Cochran of Newark (Licking Co.) has been reappointed to the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Board of Directors for a term beginning June 12, 2020, and ending June 11, 2023.David W. Johnson of Salem (Columbiana Co.) has been reappointed to the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Board of Directors for a term beginning June 12, 2020, and ending June 11, 2023. Peggy Griffith of Deerfield (Portage Co.) has been reappointed to the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Board of Directors for a term beginning June 12, 2020, and ending June 11, 2023. Check out Governor DeWine’s video featuring many Ohio businesses, who are making parts, new machines, and producing in-demand products related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Dan Tierney: 614-644-0957

Here’s the news:

  • Ohio’s COVID-19 case data is below:
    • 17,962 confirmed cases
    • 781 probable cases  
    • 18,743 total cases
    • 3,634 hospitalizations
    • 922 confirmed deaths
    • 80 probable deaths
    • 1,002 total deaths
    • 1,056 ICU admissions
    • More data is available on the COVID-19 Dashboard HERE.
  • Today, Governor DeWine discussed the new Stay Safe Ohio Order. The order reopens businesses with exceptions, and details COVID-19 prevention requirements for operating businesses. A copy of the order is attached as well as statements of support from the Ohio Council of Retail Merchants and the Ohio Chapter, American College of Surgeons.
  • Governor DeWine announced the members of two separate advisory groups for recommendations and best practices when reopening dine-in restaurants, and personal service locations (hair salons, barbershops, etc.) throughout the state.A list of individuals serving on the restaurant advisory group can be found HERE. A list of individuals serving on the personal services advisory group can be found HERE.
  • Attached are the following documents: Stay Safe Ohio Order FAQ’s, information on continued business and operations closures, masks in the workplace FAQ’s, industry specific guidelines and best practices documents. More detailed information on the Responsible RestartOhio plan can be found at www.coronavirus.ohio.gov/ResponsibleRestartOhio

Rebecca R. Nelson, MA, Community Engagement Strategic Adviser

______________________________

Governor DeWine Extends School Closure Order

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today announced that the Ohio Department of Health will extend its order to keep schools closed through the end of April. Ohio’s previous order was set to expire on April 3, 2020. The new order will extend the closure through May 1, 2020. “There is the real possibility that our schools could stay closed longer than this, but we want to give parents and teachers as much notice and flexibility as we can,” said Governor DeWine. “Schools should continue to do what they’re doing now — providing the best remote learning that they can, serving meals to students in new ways, and planning for what the rest of the year may look like.”

HOMELESSNESS TEAM: Governor DeWine announced today that he has formed a “Homelessness Team” to help people who may rely on homeless shelters, domestic shelters, group homes, and recovery housing – all of which pose challenges for social distancing. The Coalition on Housing and Homelessness in Ohio, the Ohio Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and Ohio Recovery Housing are working as part of this team to provide localized guidelines for these shelters. They will also work to incorporate these populations into the state’s ongoing planning for access to healthcare through community health centers and planning for quarantine or isolation. In addition, the Ohio Housing Financing Agency Board has approved $5 million in unrestricted Agency General Fund Reserves to be used for Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Rehousing funds and Emergency Rental Assistance that will be distributed through the state’s nine Continua of Care.The Ohio Development Services Agency has also established a $1 million Emergency Shelter Gap Funding Program to support emergency shelter providers during the COVID-19 state of emergency. The Development Services Agency will reallocate Community Development Block Grant dollars to emergency shelter providers to meet immediate needs for homeless individuals and households. Further, the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services is directing some federal opioid response funding to help people living in recovery housing or engaged in treatment to maintain their current housing and prevent homelessness.  Federal funds will be deployed to cover additional expenses that adult care facilities are taking on because of COVID-19.The CDC guidelines and information about all of these funding opportunities are available on coronavirus.ohio.gov, and anyone with questions can email COVID19Housing@mha.ohio.gov

BUSINESS ADVISORY GROUP: Governor DeWine also announced today that he will develop a business advisory group to convene over the phone to: 

  1. Ensure businesses are doing everything they can to keep their employees safe;
  2. Provide recommendations (to the greatest extent possible) to mitigate the negative impact the COVID-19 crisis is having on our economy in Ohio;
  3. Provide recommendations on building a platform for economic recovery.

More details on this group will be released in the near future. 

PRISONS AND PPE: Due to the shortage of PPE in Ohio, the inmates incarcerated at Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction prisons have begun making some of these necessary healthcare supplies.So far, inmates have made 500 hospital gowns and will make 44,000 more when they get additional fabric.  Inmates will also begin making cough masks – similar to surgical masks — and will be able to make 5,000 a day up to a total of 2 million.  They will also make hand sanitizer. and face shields.  Each prison with its own workshop will also make masks for the people in those prisons.

CURRENT OHIO DATA: There are 1,933 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ohio and 39 deaths. A total of 475 people have been hospitalized, including 163 admissions to intensive care units. In-depth data can be accessed by visiting coronavirus.ohio.gov. Video of today’s full update, including versions with foreign language closed captioning, can be viewed on the Ohio Channel’s YouTube page. For more information on Ohio’s response to COVID-19, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH.

NATIONAL DOCTORS’ DAY: Enjoy this tribute to Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton, MD, MPH, in honor of National Doctors’ Day.             

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